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Pork Tenderloin & Veggie Kabobs with Southwest Chopped Salad

Pork Tenderloin & Veggie Kabobs with Southwest Chopped SaladdownloadEmail This Post
Pork Tenderloin & Veggie Kabobs with Southwest Chopped Salad

Prep: 20 minutes plus soaking
Grill: 13 minutes • Serves: 4

Pork Tenderloin Kabobs

12 (8-inch) wooden skewers
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 teaspoons lime zest
1-1/2teaspoons chili powder
1/2teaspoon kosher salt
1/2teaspoon fresh ground black pepper
2 small pork tenderloins (about 1 pound each), cut into 1-1/2-inch pieces
2 orange and/or red bell peppers, cut into 1-1/2-inch pieces
1 small red onion, cut into 1-1/2-inch pieces

Southwest Chopped Salad

1 (10- to 13-ounce) bag Southwest-style chopped salad kit
1 large avocado, peeled, pitted and sliced
3 tablespoons coarsely chopped fresh cilantro

1.Prepare Pork Tenderloin Kabobs: Prepare outdoor grill for direct grilling over medium-high heat; soak skewers in water 20 minutes. In medium bowl, whisk lime juice, oil, lime zest, chili powder, salt and black pepper; add pork and toss.

2. Alternately thread pork, bell peppers and onion onto skewers. Place skewers on hot grill rack; cover and cook 13 minutes or until internal temperature of pork reaches 145°, turning once.

3. Prepare Southwest Chopped Salad: In large bowl, toss salad kit, avocado and cilantro. Makes about 5 cups.

4. Serve 8 kabobs with salad; slightly cool remaining 4 kabobs, wrap with aluminum foil and refrigerate up to 2 days. Use leftover kabobs in the Thai Peanut Pork & Veggie Fried Rice recipe.


Approximate nutritional values per serving (2 kabobs, 1-1/4 cups salad):
379 Calories, 21g Fat (4g Saturated), 94mg Cholesterol, 481mg Sodium,
16g Carbohydrates, 6g Fiber, 4g Sugars, 34g Protein

Dietitian’s Dish:
Making a double portion of the main entrée item on Day 1 will help you cut the cooking time on Day 2. Eating leftovers doesn’t have to be boring. Plan distinctly different ethnic flavor profiles on Day 2. It helps make batch cooking and eating leftovers more appealing.